Sunday, June 6, 2010

Silent Sunday's blog

Today is June 6. On this date in 1944, 160,000 allied infantry and armored troops landed in Normandy (France). The air strikes, which involved over 24,000, began prior to the amphibious strike, the largest in history. The cost of life was high, but this was the surge that was needed to eventually defeat the Germans.

What I found fascinating was how weather played such an important part in D-Day. Both a full moon and a high tide were needed. The full moon was needed to guide the troops onto the beaches and the high tide was needed to navigate the waters that had dangerous obstacles placed there by the Germans.

There are many web sites devoted to D-Day, including The National D-Day Memorial Foundation (in Virginia in the US) and tons of photos and video provided by the US Army. But the link I have chosen is one that focuses on D-Day from the UK and Normandy. Allied naval personnel, as well as aircraft, troops, and materials all came from the UK. When it was unclear if the attack would take place in June due to poor weather conditions, allied troops took refuge along the south coast of Britain.

As a bit of history, British troops were sent to Sword Beach, Gold Beach, and Juno Beach, along with Canadian troops. American troops landed on Omaha and Utah Beaches. Juno and Omaha Beaches suffered very little damage from air strikes because visibility was so poor. This made the amphibious landings far more difficult and dangerous.

If you are familiar with D-Day, any of the above sites will be a fun read. But the one showing what D-Day in Normandy was like, will be well worth the read. Have a great D-Day and remember what these great soldiers fought and died for.

7 thoughtful remarks:

Halle said...

Very interesting. Thanks for the mini history lesson.

Julia Dunnit said...

That last link goes to a great site Elizabeth. If any of your readers ever get to Europe, I would say that however quick or squashed into an itinerary, everyone should visit one of the D Day landing sites, and maybe a cemetary. Scale alone is jaw dropping....the very air is tinged with memories that belong to others and respect. Humbling trip, I tell ya.

Tess said...

You are full of wonderful trivia that is vewry meaningful. Than ks for the lessons and links.

Lori Saul said...

I always learn something from your posts - you are a wonderful teacher and a bit of an historian. Looks like a nice museum with art inside and out!

Dawn said...

Yes D-Day we should never forget should we! A lot died that day to get on that beach and what brave loyal men they all were! thank you for the reminder & links

Love Dawn xx

Karen said...

My Dad has spent today over in Normandy taking part in the 'Remeberance' services. He also went to visit his fathers grave as he was killed just after he got off the beach. They were all amazing men and although all this happened before my time I really feel dtrongly that we should never forget. So I am very pleased that the schools here in England have started running trips to these areas. HUGS XXX

Melinda Cornish said...

I have never read about it from the UK's point of view.....the whole thing was amazing and scary and such a loss of life.......the price of freedom....