Friday, October 22, 2010

Inspiration Avenue Challenge: Harvest

It's Friday and my day to feature my take on the weekly Inspiration Avenue challenge. This week's challenge is harvest, as provided by Judy Goddard. It's been a very bad year in my garden. Last year at this time I was still collecting a record crop of tomatoes, peppers, and herbs. This year, my garden was dead in August, due to record heat and lack of moisture. Even my flower garden suffered, as I only got one rose this entire year, and I normally get at least two bloomings and dozens of blooms from my Queen Elizabeth bush.

So I had to hunt far and wide, and finally found these.

I am not sure if they are sunflowers, because I didn't plant them, but they are growing in my back yard, the only color in a dead and dying landscape.

A bit of color correction in Photoshop and they take on a much richer color. With the enhanced color, I believe they might be Helianthus angustifolia or Narrow Leaved Sunflowers as shown by Dianne at Pieces of D on Tuesday of this week. Dianne's photo shows them growing wild and obviously, mine are too. If anyone knows for sure what these are, they are more than welcome to let me know. They are the only harvest I could find and am so happy to have them! Thank you Judy for forcing me to play hunter/gatherer/harvester this week.

Because Judy picked the challenge theme this week, I am featuring her blog JudyAGoddard, Artisan as my blog pick of the day. Judy is fearless in what she makes and tackles. Whether it's working at the potter's wheel, spinning wool (or dog hair), or painting, Judy puts her heart and soul into her art. Thanks for the challenge, Judy, and thanks for sharing your lovely blog with us.

20 thoughtful remarks:

Stephanie Mealor Corder said...

Those are Swamp sunflowers- very pretty, but VERY invasive. They are also pretty much immune to drought conditions.....so this is a good year to have them :) I started with a couple of transplants from my Mom and now, my front garden is filled with them- like a wall of gold!

Healing Woman said...

They also look like black-eyed Susans. I can't tell how large they are from the picture. Whatever they are, you have enhanced them well and did a great job with the harvest challenge.

Liverpool Lou (Anne) said...

Hi Elizabeth, am still here ;-) just decided to have a week off - from the computer! Will pop back later to check out your blog need to walk DD's dog before I go out
Anne xx

Kiki said...

Beautiful...i think they are giorgeous and dazzling!
lovely!
Victoria~

Terri Kahrs said...

This year was a challenging year for gardens all over the country. We had a soggy, wet spring and a super hot summer. Sure put my gardening skills to the test!!! Happy Weekend, Elizabeth!!! Hugs, Terri xoxox

Magpie said...

Beautiful cheerful flowers! You ARE lucky to have them. Nothing's left in my garden... There are so many types of sunflowers ~ that's what I think they are. Or could they even be a type of daisy? They have a daisy-like look to them.

Thanks for the tip on beeswax! I did try a hair dryer on another piece. And you are right about being gentle with the heat. I think I overdid it! I'll give it a try again and be more patient this time!

Have a great day!

Maggie

~*~Patty S said...

Shame about the garden season, Mother Nature was hot hot hot this summer wasn't she!
Lovely flowers, I bet they do well in a vase too!
Happy Friday!
oxo

La Dolce Vita said...

they look like weeds to me! although beautiful!! off to check out your link... should be a bit cooler today, I hear...

elle said...

Obviously a balance is needed. You were hot and dry and we were cold and wet. 8) As the farmers say, next year...

see you there! said...

Any garden flowers this time of year are great to see. We still have a few marigold hanging in on and the Christmas cactus is putting out buds. That's about it.

Darla

Marilyn Rock said...

Mother Nature isn't always kind to our gardens. These do bring to mind black-eyed susan's. xxoo

Liverpool Lou (Anne) said...

I've just been Googling your flowers because they looked like marguerietes or large daisies to me and discovered that helianthus and daisies are in the same family. They do indeed look like the helianthus augustifolia that I found online :-)
Anne xx

Susan Allan said...

What ever they are called, they are very pretty and I think Helianthus is correct. Tracy Evans is a horticultural expert, if anyone knows for sure, it is, Tracy. Why not ask her?
Have a wonderful weekend
Sue xx

Grannie Annie said...

You can never go wrong with flower...these are wonderful so bright and cheery...a lovely harvest.

ScottT said...

Just what I'm looking for. The entrance to the Thode farm has those a quarter mile in each direction. I'd like a big old patch of those to back my front fence.

Yvonne said...

They look like our wild sunflowers called Maximillian sunflowers. We have them all over the place. Very pretty I think. Will check out the link. Thanks.

Karen said...

Hi my lovely, about Art, heart & healing...I couldn't download/open the videos at all so I just printed out the PDF's and then kept looking on the site at Tams portrait. You wrote some lovely words about mine & I am delighted that you like it but do have a go yourself. You say that you can't draw but we are all artists in this crafty world we live in :D HUGS XXX

Marlynn said...

LOL - whatever they are, Elizabeth - they are sure darn pretty! M

Tracy Evans said...

Hi Elizabeth, from the picture your flower looks like either a Helianthus, Rudbeckia or Helenium. What ever it is I must say it's lovely and cheery, but I am sure it's one of those. Sorry could not be of more help. Tracy Evans x

gemma said...

One thing I remember about Kansas is Sunflowers. Fields and fields of beautiful sunflowers and blue skies. Your art reminds me of that.